You Say You’re a Christian; But, You’re Really Not

So many (all?) of Christian’s worshiping comes directly from Paganism. But, if you look at any so-called Christian holiday, you find all kinds of sick rituals.

easterEaster owes its origin to the old Teutonic mythology. The name Easter was originally derived from the word Eostre. Eostre was the ancient Greek goddess of spring. It was believed that every year, Eostre returned to Earth after a long, cold winter and brought along with her the light and warmth of Spring. Thus, ancient Greeks held pagan festivals to welcome Eostre and herald the onset of spring.

The Pagan festivals always coincided with the vernal Equinox on the 21st of March every year. Though the Greek were not fully cognizant of why and when spring comes, they believed Eostre must be pleased to ensure that she returns year after year. The festivals were lavish feasts that celebrated the booming of new flowers, the chirping of birds, butterflies, and sunshine and in general the feeling of rejuvenation that is inherent of spring.

The Christian church however, changed the Pagan festival from a celebration of spring to a celebration of the resurrection of Jesus. In 325 A.D. the church also changed the date of the festival.

The idea that a pagan celebration twisted into a pure biblical holiday is just sick. SICK! People have told me over the past 35 yrs that  it doesn’t matter, as long as we love God. Nooooot true.

If you’re gonna follow the scriptures, Jesus made it clear to do only one thing in celebration of his life and legacy:

Luke 22:19-20 Also, he took a loaf,  gave thanks, broke it, and gave it to them, saying: “This means my body, which is to be given in your behalf.  Keep doing this in remembrance of me.” Also, he did the same with the cup after they had the evening meal, saying: “This cup means the new covenant by virtue of my blood, which is to be poured out in your behalf.

This is our only request from the Savior, Yeshua. He never said, “Hey! It’s winter, let’s spend every dime we have and buy unwanted gifts for people who really don’t want them or deserve them. And let’s cut down a living tree and shove it in our house and call it “My Birthday!” Nor did he say, “You know, because I’m gonna die soon, let’s go find a bunch of chicken eggs, color them with fancy colors and hide them all over the yard!”

His only request was for once a year to recognize him as our sacrifice. And what do we do? We turn it into another warped celebration of a pagan goddess called Eostre.

The first Easter Bunny legend was documented in the 1500s. By 1680, the first story about a rabbit laying eggs and hiding them in a garden was published. These legends were brought to the United States in the 1700s, when German immigrants settled in Pennsylvania Dutch country, according to the Center for Children’s Literature and Culture.

The tradition of making nests for the rabbit to lay its eggs in soon followed. Eventually, nests became decorated baskets and colorful eggs were swapped for candy, treats and other small gifts.

So Yeshua gave us only one request with regards to His life and legacy, Luke 22:19 “…Keep doing this in remembrance of me.” No more. No less.

So, if you’re so darn committed to Christianity, then step off the pagan BS and be pure. Be real. Be honest. And stop celebrating the toxic beliefs of old.

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One Response to You Say You’re a Christian; But, You’re Really Not

  1. thalassa says:

    So…your history is quite bad here. Ishtar and Eostre are not the same goddess, and in fact, the historical evidince for a goddess named Eostre is quite lacking (its far more likely Eostre was an invention of Bede). As a Pagan (and, as the name of a family of religious traditions, it should be capitalized), I’m quite critical of the promulgation of poor history when it comes to Christianity, whether it originates in my religion or yours. Poor history should never be the basis for judging the religious practices of others.

    Like

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